surly temple
Lena Dunham is not representing all of us. Her characters aren’t reflecting every 20-something girl, no matter how much the title of her show or the “plainness” of her face might make us occasionally forget otherwise. She is not speaking for all us (and nor should she), but she is speaking about some of us. For those of us who aren’t ashamed to admit it, the characters in Girls help to normalise what our lives can be like. In the same way, My Mad Fat Diary is painting a picture of what it can mean to be a teenage girl dealing with the burden of being a teenage girl. It is not the story of every mentally ill person, every teenager living in Lincolnshire in the 1990s, nor every fat girl dealing with crushes and clothes shopping and pool parties. Rae doesn’t represent all of us but, like Hannah, she’s ticking a few boxes that, up until now, have gone unchecked on TV.
I wrote this post about Hannah Horvath and Rae Earl back in February but never shared it. 
Rae Earl’s teenage diaries

Rae Earl’s teenage diaries